National

Lima: Remains of presumed weaver dating back to 3,500 years ago found in huaca

Hillary Ojeda

Archaeologists reveal the discovered remains of a weaver in Lima’s oldest huaca.

Lima: Remains of presumed weaver dating back to 3,500 years ago found in huaca

Ancient remains of weaver. (YouTube capture: El Paraíso: hallan restos de tejedora de hace más de 3,500 años)

Archaeologists announced the discovery of a presumed weaver at Lima’s oldest huaca, El Paraiso (Paradise).

The remains were found with weaving materials and date back to more than 3,500 years ago, reports Peru21.

Located only a few kilometers north of the Peruvian capital, in the district of San Martin de Porres, the remains found in El Paraiso have led specialists to believe that the Lima settlement had contact with highland cultures.

5 fictional settings portraying Peruvian elements

Chief of the archaeological project at the El Paraiso huaca, Cecilia Aguilar, told Andina news agency that the female weaver had textile instruments and products that did not originate from the coast. This indicates the possibility that they had contact with outside communities.

Following analysis of the remains, they believe that the individual died due to a hit to the face and was unable to cure it.

Additionally findings include clay figures and food waste dating back to more than 3,500 years ago (considered the Cotton Preceramic period).

Specialists have also reported that some of the objects found depicted on clay figures are similar to those found in Caral.

Watch footage of remains discovered in Lima’s oldest huaca


YouTube: El Paraíso: hallan restos de tejedora de hace más de 3,500 años

Your comment will be submitted for approval by an administrator. We reserve the right to not publish offensive or profane remarks.