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Peru: archeologists uncover unusual object buried in ancient ruins

By Manuel Vigo

Archeologists working the Trujillo, La Libertad, have uncovered an unusual metallic object buried in the city of Chan Chan.

Peru: archeologists uncover unusual object buried in ancient ruins

(Photo: Andina)

Archeologists working the Trujillo, La Libertad, have uncovered an unusual metallic object buried in the city of Chan Chan.


The piece, which is slightly tapered at the ends, and wide in the middle, has silver inlays in it, state news agency Andina reported.


According to Colin Thomas, an archeological specialist from Yale University, the object likely belonged to a high-ranking member of the group, and was used as a lethal tool during human sacrifices.


The object Andina said, was found by archeologists Liliana Calipuy and José Armas, last August.


Initially researchers believed the piece could have been made from iridium, a very hard, yet brittle, silvery-white metal.


Tests eventually revealed that the object was made form an alloy, made from 90 percent lead, and 10 percent iron, copper and zinc, coated with a pigment made from calcium, potassium, and sulfur.


According to Alfredo Narvaez, the discovery has lead to new hypothesis regarding metals in the Andean region.


"It was originally believed that lead was a material brought by the Spaniards, for use in ammunition, however, the metal already existed in the country and therein lies the importance of this find," he said to Andina.


"I do not think there are many sources of lead in the coasts,” he added.