Fashion

Lima Fashion Week: Approaching a change

Antonio Choy-Kay & Gerardo Larrea

Editors of biannual fashion magazine, SKIN, Choy-Kay and Larrea give us the good, the bad, and the 3 pitfalls of LIFWeek.

Lima Fashion Week: Approaching a change

(Ugo Camera. Exclusively for LIFWeek)

Leaving behind the tense and prolonged electoral climate we’ve had to endure for the past few months, the designers who showed during Fall/Winter 2016 edition of LIFWeek (Lima Fashion Week) decided to put a note in high key for their collections.

Hosted in a new venue, The Grand Convention Center of Lima (El Gran Centro de Convenciones), the event portayed a wide range of proposals, including standouts from international guests. Spanish duo Alvarno (Arnaud Maillard and Alvaro Castejon) showed a great example of their impeccable pattern work, made of remarkable materials with incredible finishes – a diversion from their usual theatrical showcases.

These types of proposals are vital for Fashion Week, in order to challenge us to think outside the box. In this edition, we were introduced to the newly formed duo Vnro+Amro (Edward Venero and Amaro Casanova) who filled the catwalk with joy and color. Their inspiration is based on iconography from Peru’s northern cultures mixed with the aesthetics of India, creating an extraordinary collage of ideas, playing with proportions, mixing materials and a free use of prints. The harmony in the pieces presented by the two artists was more evident in some of their looks, and less so in others, but it’s necessary to take risks sometimes, and they did.

dress
(Ugo Camera. Exclusively for LIFWeek)

Other collections, such as that presented by Jose Francisco Ramos, under the category of New Talent, drew a lot of attention from the young audience members. With exquisite tailoring and clean cuts, Ramos, no stranger to the fashion industry, presented a subtle and minimalist collection, supported by a genderless concept that was evident in the staging.

Of the other two participants in the category, Paola Gamero and Diego López de la Fuente, had some outstanding pieces to show, especially the knitting of López de la Fuente. Perhaps it was the pressure from participating in their first event, but they failed to complete all of their proposals. In both cases it felt like there was something missing or forced, but with a little bit more consistency, they have the talent to yield more favorable results in the future.

Omar Valladolid, who every time has more followers, presented a collection full of drama. With an overall clean look, the pieces ranged from beige suits with architectural designs, to the more common color black. His collection flirts with the idea of mixing gender styles, particularly visible in his model selection. A variation of the materials used is necessary to evolve, as well as reaching a balance in concepts of his pieces and their functionality.

Designer Sikta Semsch, who managed to reinvent herself last season, returned to exploring more familiar styles with an adult collection. Although sometimes her layering work looks forced, her work with color and prints stands out. Standouts in the collection were a suit jacket and pants with a mix of prints and the use of color, especially with the hot pink dress.

men
(Ugo Camera. Exclusively for LIFWeek)

Inspired by her family’s lineage, specifically her grandmother, Alessandra Petersen presented a collection with a rebellious soul, reflecting the spirit of the creative herself. Although unable to match her previous Winter collection success, the designer’s intention to explore new formats and materials (incorporation of velvet, and an outstanding knitting job) are welcome.

Ana Maria Guiulfo and Yirko Sivirich, both of whom recently participated in the Miami Fashion Week, offered collections showing great progress, but nevertheless resorted to a formula that clearly works for them commercially. Yirko stood out for his coat collection: some in color blocks, others cut at bias with great improvement in their finishes. However, the bride at the end of the presentation seemed out of place and should’ve had her own space and time because it took from the consistency of the rest of the show. He now has the big challenge to keep building his brand identity without looking the same for next season. So with the right allies, he will explode and getting stronger.Ana G, on the other hand, based her collection on the late seventies where, as expected, her hand-painted canvases and graphics took over the catwalk. The pieces had a wide range in styles, emphasized by her coats- especially the mint green. In addition to the jacket and loose dresses, a definite improvement over past collections was made.

lif
(Ugo Camera. Exclusively for LIFWeek)

Claudia Jimenez presented perhaps her riskiest collection yet; exploring new currents and movements is always welcome. However, her collection failed to come full circle: a strong start to the presentation only came to lose intensity, energy and unity, especially the bride who looked as if she belonged to another collection.

Noe Bernacelli presented a collection- her riskiest to date -reflecting a change to what we’ve come to expect from her. Without losing her romanticism and femininity, we now see a woman that is more empowered and bold, even flirting with a more urban sensuality. The collection has outstanding detailed finish on every piece, thus achieving a much more adult feel than her previous collection. This is something the designer should continue exploring.

Overall, the show was a true visual delight. It was evident each designer’s intention to show a personalized show to submerge the audience into their own universe. However, three big issues were evident during the show. First, the explicit use of some recognizable fashion references was evident in more than one collection, which makes it difficult to appreciate the true identity of each creator. The second is that there is a big problem with the production of the presentations. Less is always more, unless the more is memorable enough to be included as part of the proposal. It was evident that several collections were not as memorable due to the fact the designers tried to show everything at once, or did not give the appropriate dress to the right model, or even gave them shoes that prevented them from a fluid walk, causing some visible discomfort. This causes a distraction for the audience and takes away from what’s really transpiring in the runway, forcing them to take refuge in their cell phones. Finally, the absence of day proposals was evident. Most designers today are still only wanting women to dress for night events or a marriage, limiting their audience. It’s necessary, with so much competition, to shift focus and dress women for different times of the day. The working woman, the professional or the mother who also wants to look good. The misconception that luxury and elegance are only for certain time (the night) is not only obsolete but also fails to represent the real value of fashion, more so in a market like ours.

The collections that stand out are those that can combine a solid point of view with a selection of pieces that sustains them. In a few years fashion can become a powerful industry where all participants can contribute their own talent to the evolution of fashion in Peru. For this reason we look forward to the new edition of LIFWeek, full of renovated proposals and riskier design. And if there is something that Peru’s recent elections can teach us, it is that we must always be open to change.

Follow Antonio Choy-Kay & Gerardo Larrea (collectively known as Larrea Choykay) on Facebook. Editors of the biannual fashion magazine, SKIN, you can also find them on Instagram.

TAGS:

lif

,

fashion

,

skin

Your comment will be submitted for approval by an administrator. We reserve the right to not publish offensive or profane remarks.